May 19-21, 2015
Long Beach, CA, USA

co-located with:
May 19-21, 2015 | Long Beach, CA, USA

Conference program 2014

Click here to download Space conference program
April 1
Conference Day 1
Commercial Space Market

Keynote Session: Launch Services Market – Competition, Access and Affordability

View details

Keynote Session: Commercial Crew Efforts – Updates And Opportunities

View details

Adapting to ITAR Reforms - What Are The implications For Components Sales, Hosted Payloads, Crewed Vehicles and Satellites?

View details

Commercial Human Spaceflight – Risk, Regulatory and Legal Considerations

View details
April 2
Conference Day 2
Military / DoD Space

Keynote Panel: Innovation, Resiliency and Affordability — Meeting Military / DoD Space Requirements

View details

National Security Space Cost Reduction

View details

Leveraging the Potential of Hosted Payloads

View details

Evolving Military Space Architectures: Use of Smallsats and Satellite Life Extension Opportunities

View details
April 3
Conference Day 3
Game-Changing Technologies

Keynote: Game Changers

View details

Leveraging the Game-Changing Potential of 3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing)

View details

Electric Propulsion and Mission Enabling Technologies

View details

Tuesday April 1 - Commercial Space Market

Commercial Space Flight Federation

Registration Opens

Welcome Address

Robert ‘Bob’ Recker
Moderator

Robert ‘Bob’ Recker

Chairman, Steering Committee
Space Tech Conference
Space Tech Conference

Keynote Session: Launch Services Market – Competition, Access and Affordability

Space access remains both expensive and rare. It has still not reached the stage where scientists can themselves routinely travel there to conduct research, and within civil and military space, cost is still a key inhibitor to more rapid progress and innovation. With more and more commercial companies, research, and academic bodies also looking towards getting into space, lowering the cost of access is a key priority for the industry. 

Commercial companies are at the forefront of driving down cost; SpaceX in particular is potentially shaping the pricing and strategy for the launch market with its plans for reusable rockets. But how much cost reduction is likely and how long will it take to achieve?  This panel will examine these questions, and further considerations including:

  • What enabling technologies are required?
  • What are the best types of vehicle to develop?
  • What is the US government doing to encourage new entrants to the launch market?
  • Reliability versus cost considerations
  • Payload weight - what are the maximum capacities that can be carried?
  • What business models and partnership models will drive down cost?
Carissa Christensen
Moderator

Carissa Christensen

Managing Partner
The Tauri Group
The Tauri Group
Gwynne Shotwell
Speaker

Gwynne Shotwell

President & COO
SpaceX
SpaceX
Daniel J Collins
Speaker

Daniel J Collins

COO
United Launch Alliance
United Launch Alliance
Clay Mowry
Speaker

Clay Mowry

President
Arianespace
Arianespace
Frank Culbertson
Speaker

Frank Culbertson

Executive Vice President
Orbital Sciences Corporation
Orbital Sciences Corporation

Morning Refreshments - served in the foyer outside the conference room

Keynote Session: Commercial Crew Efforts – Updates And Opportunities

NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) invests financial and technical resources to stimulate efforts within the private sector to develop and demonstrate safe, reliable, and cost-effective space transportation capabilities. Offering perspectives from NASA and its commercial partners, this session will share key program updates, examining the impact of budget cuts, and sharing insight into the progress of newly added milestones that are intended to reduce risks, advance the partners' development efforts or accelerate schedules consistent with the goals of CCP.

The session will also examine the potential future development of the Commercial Crew Program, exploring issues such as:

  • What new exploration partnerships might be possible?
    • What will NASA and industry partnerships look like 10 years from now?
    • What are the key areas for partnering?
    • Who are the big players?
    • How do you start the dialogue?
  • Managing the impact of budget cuts - how do you focus investment with shrinking resources?
  • ​What RFIs are emerging?  What possible areas are there for NASA to partner with commercial companies? What are the different partnership options for:
    • Mars Rover Challenges
    • Different exploration challenges
    • Asteroid missions
Phil McAlister
Moderator

Phil McAlister

Director, Commercial Spaceflight
NASA
NASA
Kathy Lueders
Speaker

Kathy Lueders

Acting Program Manager, Commercial Crew Program
NASA
NASA
John Curry
Speaker

John Curry

Senior Director and Dream Chaser Co-Program Manager
Sierra Nevada Corporation
Sierra Nevada Corporation
Dr Garrett Reisman
Speaker

Dr Garrett Reisman

DragonRider Project Manager
SpaceX
SpaceX
Christopher Ferguson
Speaker

Christopher Ferguson

Director of Crew and Mission Operations; CST-100
Boeing
Boeing

Lunch - served in Expo Hall A

Adapting to ITAR Reforms - What Are The implications For Components Sales, Hosted Payloads, Crewed Vehicles and Satellites?

For more than a decade the export and import of many defense-related articles and services – including satellites and satellite components – have been placed on the US Munitions List (USML) covered by the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR). To be ITAR compliant, a manufacturer or exporter whose services or systems intended for use in space appear on the USML list, must register with the US State Department’s Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (DDTC).

In 2013, Congress passed reforms to ITAR that removed most satellites and satellite technologies from the USML for most US allies and major trading partners. The US Commerce Department proposed draft regulations implementing this change in May of 2013 and received industry comments in July. This panel will bring together a variety of expert perspectives to discuss the anticipated impact of these changes on the space market, including:

  • Summarizing the new rules (Commerce Dept. perspective)
  • How will ITAR reform impact satellite OEMS and associated suppliers in the US and beyond?  Are European companies more or less likely to do business with USA now?
  • ​Legal issues – what are the gray areas and potential challenges to overcome?
Frank Slazer
Moderator

Frank Slazer

Vice President – Space Systems
AIA
AIA
John Ordway
Speaker

John Ordway

Partner
Berliner, Corcoran & Rowe LLP
Berliner, Corcoran & Rowe LLP
Debra Facktor Lepore
Speaker

Debra Facktor Lepore

Vice President and General Manager Strategic Operations
Ball Aerospace
Ball Aerospace
Sam Black
Speaker

Sam Black

Director of Policy
Satellite Industry Association
Satellite Industry Association
Mark Jaso
Speaker

Mark Jaso

Senior Engineer, Office of National Security and Technology Transfer Controls
U.S. Department of Commerce
U.S. Department of Commerce

Afternoon Refreshments - served in the foyer outside the conference room

Commercial Human Spaceflight – Risk, Regulatory and Legal Considerations

​With Virgin Galactic, XCOR and others getting closer to their goal of commercial spaceflight, there are still a number of regulatory, safety and risk management challenges that remain unresolved. Bringing together key perspectives from the commercial sector, as well as legal experts and key drivers of regulatory policy including the Commercial Spaceflight Federation and the Federal Aviation Authority/AST, this session will explore issues including:

  • What are the risks associated with ‘citizens in space’? What are the implications of a serious accident on the carrier? (Legal perspectives on space tourism)
  • ​Risk management and mission insurance considerations
  • What progress has the CSF and FAA/CST made in defining regulatory policy for human spaceflight and safety issues? ‘Draft Established Practices for Human Space Flight Occupant Safety’
  • Outlining current work in defining technical standards

 

Michael Lopez-Alegria
Moderator

Michael Lopez-Alegria

President
Commercial Spaceflight Federation
Commercial Spaceflight Federation
George Zamka
Speaker

George Zamka

Deputy Associate Administrator, Commercial Space Transportation
FAA
FAA
Ann Zulkosky
Speaker

Ann Zulkosky

Senior Professional Staff
US Senate Commerce Subcommittee on Science and Space
US Senate Commerce Subcommittee on Science and Space
Jeff Greason
Speaker

Jeff Greason

CEO
XCOR Aerospace
XCOR Aerospace
Doug Griffith
Speaker

Doug Griffith

Co-Founder, Director and General Counsel
Golden Spike Company
Golden Spike Company

Closing Remarks by the Chairman

Close of Conference Day 1 and Evening Networking Reception - in Expo Hall A

Wednesday April 2 – Military & DoD Space

Registration Opens

Welcome Address

Robert ‘Bob’ Recker
Moderator

Robert ‘Bob’ Recker

Chairman, Steering Committee
Space Tech Conference
Space Tech Conference

Keynote Panel: Innovation, Resiliency and Affordability — Meeting Military / DoD Space Requirements

In April 2013 Gen. William Shelton, commander of US Air Force Space Command, said that shrinking government budgets, combined with a growing reliance on space assets, were putting the US in an undefended position and therefore at risk.  Every US military action depends on space capabilities such as satellite-based surveillance, communications, and mapping and weather technologies. Critics in some quarters say that current satellite networks are not robust and there is not sufficient backup if these technologies were to fail. The threats to US spacecraft include not just deliberate attacks by hostile states, but also the possibility of a collision with a piece of space debris.

Managing these threats and bolstering US space resources within the drastic budget constraints of sequestration is a major challenge currently facing the Air Force, Navy, Army and Marine Corps.  This session will examine how different departments within DoD can evolve their operational and business strategies, develop new architectures and improve acquisition policies in line with the key priority to build resilience and drastically improve affordability.

The session will examine questions including:

  • Disaggregation– how do we lower the cost of access to space?
  • The cost reduction toolkit – disaggregation; hosted payloads; small satellites; commercial services
  • ​How can we better motivate the commercial market to do government and military missions?
  • How can military/DoD learn to fundamentally do business differently, rather than just cut costs?
  • ​How do you provide greater capabilities within budget restrictions?  Threats are going up, yet budgets are decreasing - how do you provide protection cost effectively?
  • How do you transfer commercial principles and lessons learned to the military / government environment?
  • ​How can different parts of DoD such as SMC, SMDC and SPAWAR collaborate better in an effort to reduce cost and improve efficiency?
  • How will government procurement policy evolve to a new paradigm?
  • ​What does a resilient constellation look like? What are the metrics
Jerry M. 'Mike' Drennan
Moderator

Jerry M. 'Mike' Drennan

Senior Vice President, Operations and Support Group
The Aerospace Corporation
The Aerospace Corporation
Mark C. Calassa
Speaker

Mark C. Calassa

Vice President, Protected Communications
Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company
Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company
Arnie Streland
Speaker

Arnie Streland

Director, Strategy and Business Development
ATK Aerospace Group
ATK Aerospace Group
James R. Horejsi, GG-15, DAF
Speaker

James R. Horejsi, GG-15, DAF

GPS Chief Engineer
AF Space & Missile Systems Center (SMC)
AF Space & Missile Systems Center (SMC)
Willard B Strozier
Speaker

Willard B Strozier

Director, Office of Small Business Programs
Space & Missile Systems Center (SMC)
Space & Missile Systems Center (SMC)

Morning Refreshments - served in the foyer outside the conference room

National Security Space Cost Reduction

With declining defense budgets, US space capabilities will be increasingly difficult to sustain in the future. Due to the very tight federal budget environment, reducing the cost of space systems is paramount since additional resources for space systems will likely be taken from other vital programs.

The AIA has identified four primary areas where steps are being successfully undertaken by industry and government to adapt and provide the best capabilities in this challenging environment. These include a focus on contractors’ internal management and product portfolios; support for acquisitions and procurement innovation; supporting new ways of doing business; and strategic investments to advance new paradigms of hardware development. Bringing together experts from military/DoD, industry associations and commercial space players, this panel will examine successful tools that can be used to reduce cost and serve as a starting point for future cost reduction efforts.

Frank Slazer
Moderator

Frank Slazer

Vice President – Space Systems
AIA
AIA
Bernard F Collins II
Speaker

Bernard F Collins II

Senior Advisor
Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Jim Simpson
Speaker

Jim Simpson

President, Boeing Satellite Systems International, Inc.
Robert J. Aalseth
Speaker

Robert J. Aalseth

Chief, Advanced Concepts Division, MILSATCOM Systems Directorate
Space and Missile Systems Center
Space and Missile Systems Center
Marv Vander Weg
Speaker

Marv Vander Weg

Vice President of EELV Customer Office
SpaceX
SpaceX
Tim Cahill
Speaker

Tim Cahill

Vice President, Engineering
Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company
Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company

Lunch - served in Expo Hall A

Leveraging the Potential of Hosted Payloads

With the full might of sequestration cuts currently being felt, the US Government is hungry for cost-effective access to space, and hosted payloads is increasingly becoming a viable option for budget-strapped civil and military users.  Bringing together key players from across the commercial, civil and military DoD sectors, this session will explore why hosted payloads are a key tool for lowering the cost of space access, and will focus particular attention on the efforts of United States Air Force Space & Missile Systems Center (SMC) as it leads the DoD charge on hosted payloads. Key areas of discussion include:

  • What will the Air Force (and other DoD departments) use hosted payloads for? What are the different applications?
  • ​Civil and military collaboration in hosted payloads – NASA’s potential use of US Air Force contracting vehicle for the Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) mission
  • Current efforts to create standards for hosted payloads interfaces
  • ​Updates on the Hosted Payload Solutions, indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (ID/IQ) contract
Jeanne Innis Olson
Moderator

Jeanne Innis Olson

Board Member
NDIA
NDIA
Colonel Scott W Beidleman
Speaker

Colonel Scott W Beidleman

Director, Development Planning
SMC/US Air Force
SMC/US Air Force
Rich Pang
Speaker

Rich Pang

Senior Director, Hosted Payloads
SES Government Solutions (Former Lt. Col, US Air Force)
SES Government Solutions (Former Lt. Col, US Air Force)
Skot Butler
Speaker

Skot Butler

Vice President, Satellite Networks & Space Services
Intelsat General Corporation
Intelsat General Corporation
Don Brown
Speaker

Don Brown

Senior Vice President, Strategic Planning
NewSat
NewSat

Afternoon Refreshments - served in the foyer outside the conference room

Evolving Military Space Architectures: Use of Smallsats and Satellite Life Extension Opportunities

The final session of the military-focused day will examine how different parts of DoD are reducing cost and improving architecture lifecycle with the use of smallsats and other technologies and strategies to maximize and extend the life of satellites.   The session will also examine whether different parts of DoD can collaborate more effectively in order to synchronise space-related acquisitions and reduce cost. Expert speakers from the AIAA, SPAWAR (Navy), US Air Force, DARPA and Boeing, will share experience-based insights into topics including:

  • Military use of small satellites / nanosats / microsatellites / cubesats – SENSE Project update
  • ​Reducing cost and improving efficiency by extending the life of satellites / on-orbit servicing 
    opportunities / satellite elongation missions
  • Is increased alignment between Army, Air Force and Navy possible given their different requirements?
  • ​Communicating the value proposition of smallsats and satellite extension opportunities in relation to current acquisition practices

 

Andrew Santangelo
Moderator

Andrew Santangelo

Small Sat Technical Committee Chair
AIAA
AIAA
Maj. Gen. Jim Armor USAF (Ret.)
Speaker

Maj. Gen. Jim Armor USAF (Ret.)

Vice President, Strategy & Business Development, Space Systems Division
ATK Aerospace Group
ATK Aerospace Group
Captain Jacob Hempen
Speaker

Captain Jacob Hempen

Engineer
United States Air Force, GPS Directorate, Los Angeles AFB
United States Air Force, GPS Directorate, Los Angeles AFB
Robert Friend
Speaker

Robert Friend

Chief Engineer, Advanced Space & Intelligence Systems
Boeing Phantom Works
Boeing Phantom Works
David Barnhart
Speaker

David Barnhart

Program Manager, Tactical Technology Office
DARPA
DARPA

Closing Remarks and end of Conference Day 2

Thursday April 3 – Game-Changing Technologies

Registration Opens

Welcome Address

Robert ‘Bob’ Recker
Moderator

Robert ‘Bob’ Recker

Chairman, Steering Committee
Space Tech Conference
Space Tech Conference

Keynote: Game Changers

The final day of the conference will explore key technologies and strategies that have the potential to dramatically change the game in terms of accessing and operating missions in space.  Kicking off with keynote perspectives from industry pioneers, the day will explore the developments in 3D printing (additive manufacturing), robotics, reusable rockets and spacecraft, electric propulsion technologies, and strategies that could aid in cost reduction, improve manufacturing processes and significantly enhance efficiency.  

Dr Harry Partridge
Moderator

Dr Harry Partridge

Center Chief technologist
Ames Research Center, NASA
Ames Research Center, NASA
Dr Jeffrey Sheehy
9.00am – 9.45am Keynote Address: Transformative Technology Investments at NASA

Dr Jeffrey Sheehy

Senior Technical Officer - Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD)
NASA
NASA

The Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) at NASA is charged with advancing game-changing technologies needed for future space science and exploration missions to an infusion point.  STMD rapidly develops and demonstrates revolutionary high-payoff technologies through transparent collaborative partnerships, expanding the boundaries of the aerospace enterprise.  STMD employs a merit-based competition model with a portfolio approach, spanning a wide range of discipline areas and technology readiness levels.  By investing in bold, broadly applicable, transformative technologies, STMD seeks to mature the technology required for NASA’s future missions in science and exploration while proving new capabilities and lowering costs for other government agencies and commercial space activities.  The presentation will provide an overview of STMD programs and will highlight areas of current and future technology investments.

Will Pomerantz
9.45pm – 10.30am: Keynote Address: Virgin Galactic’s LauncherOne– Lowering the Cost of Space Access

Will Pomerantz

Vice President, Special Projects
Virgin Galactic
Virgin Galactic

Throughout history, spaceflight has been rare in large part because it is so expensive; it has also been expensive because it is so rare. But that vicious cycle may soon be broken, as new technologies, new customers and new services are helping to increase the frequency and decrease the cost of visiting space. Will Pomerantz of Virgin Galactic will speak about how suborbital voyages on SpaceShipTwo and orbital launches for small satellites on board LauncherOne are helping to change the game for industry veterans and newcomers alike.

Morning Refreshments - served in the foyer outside the conference room

Leveraging the Game-Changing Potential of 3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing)

"As NASA ventures further into space, whether redirecting an asteroid or sending humans to Mars, we'll need transformative technology to reduce cargo weight and volume. In the future, perhaps astronauts will be able to print the tools or components they need while in space."

     -    Charlie Bolden, Administrator, NASA

3D printing allows for objects to be specifically designed for a microgravity environment. This means that now-critical space-based technologies, such as satellite systems, could be disrupted by an innovation that could only be made in space. The ability to print items on demand away from Earth could significantly reduce the cost, extend the duration and increase the possibilities of space exploration missions. The game-changing potential of 3D printing has not gone unnoticed, with commercial, academic, government and military organizations taking active strides toward using 3D printing for aerospace applications. This panel will bring together a variety of perspectives, sharing the latest innovations and practical applications of additive manufacturing. Expert speakers from across the industry will discuss the materials that can be used, the technical approaches developed, and highlight quality control and other issues to address when considering 3D printing as a manufacturing option.

Dr Robert Hoyt
Moderator

Dr Robert Hoyt

CEO & Chief Scientist
Tethers Unlimited Inc
Tethers Unlimited Inc
Dr Lonnie Love
Speaker

Dr Lonnie Love

Group Leader, Manufacturing Systems Research
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Mike Scardera
Speaker

Mike Scardera

Director of Engineering
Millennium Space Systems
Millennium Space Systems
Dr Kenneth C. Cheung
Speaker

Dr Kenneth C. Cheung

Technical Lead, Advanced Manufacturing Systems
NASA Ames Research Center
NASA Ames Research Center
Jonathan L. Cobb
Speaker

Jonathan L. Cobb

Executive VP, Public Affairs
Stratasys
Stratasys

Lunch - served in Expo Hall A

Electric Propulsion and Mission Enabling Technologies

"Game changing is about developing transformative technologies that enable new missions and new capabilities."

     -    Stephen Gaddis, Program Manager for the Game Changing Development Program at NASA's Langley
          Research Center

Solar electric propulsion has been cited on a list of technologies NASA specified as vital for a crewed mission to Mars, as well as for asteroid retrieval and other more complex space missions. Commercial companies including Boeing, Lockheed Martin and Thales Alenia have achieved notable progress with all-electric propulsion technology, which has long proved itself a viable option for station keeping or keeping the satellite in its position in orbit, but not for orbit raising. This panel will highlight the challenges and benefits of electric and solar electric propulsion versus chemical propulsion options, as well as outline possible use cases of electric propulsion, such as on spacecraft repair vehicles and cubesats. Delegates will hear how innovations and breakthroughs in electric propulsion and mission-enabling technologies can reduce cost and improve performance.

 

Dr Harry Partridge
Moderator

Dr Harry Partridge

Center Chief technologist
Ames Research Center, NASA
Ames Research Center, NASA
Dr Paulo C. Lozano
Speaker

Dr Paulo C. Lozano

Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics / Director - Space Propulsion Laboratory
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
Dr David Manzella
Speaker

Dr David Manzella

Senior Propulsion Engineer
NASA Glenn Research Center
NASA Glenn Research Center
Chris Hoeber
Speaker

Chris Hoeber

Senior VP of Systems Engineering and CTO
Space Systems/Loral
Space Systems/Loral
Tom Kessler
Speaker

Tom Kessler

Project Leader - Advanced Power and Propulsion
Boeing Phantom Works
Boeing Phantom Works

Closing remarks and close of Conference 2014


  • "Thanks - it was great working with such a professional organization"

    --Frank Slazer, Vice President – Space Systems, AIA

  • "You can talk to 100 people within 2-3 days, it would take months to contact these people through phone"

    --Rick Hoskin, Director, ATK

  • "It’s a networking opportunity that quite frankly is priceless"

    --Marv Vander Weg, Vice President of EELV Customer Office, SpaceX

  • “We found this a great opportunity to connect and network with most of the participants. We’ve had a very busy week arranging meetings every day”

    --Ing. Alex Carrella, Product Manager Dynamic Environmental Testing, LMS International

  • “This year’s show has had a LOT of foot traffic. We’ve also had a lot of media coverage.”

    --Andrew Nelson, COO, XCOR Aerospace